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Tag Archives: pain relief

My Favorite Pain Relief Device Just Got Better!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

*Disclosure: This post includes affiliate links. Meaning that at no additional cost to you, I receive a commission when you make a purchase through my links. The proceeds earned fund the giveaways I host in my Facebook groups.

As you may already know, I have been successfully reducing pain and inflammation from fibromyalgia, psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, degenerative disc disease, and coccydynia with PEMF therapy. I use a portable device called Oska Pulse and run treatments on my pain sources all day long, every day, no matter where I am or what I am doing.

My device, which is the original version runs 30 minute treatment sessions. Having to turn it on every 30 minutes has been one of my complaints, especially when napping. I and many others requested a longer treatment running time and my friends at Oska Wellness listened. From this day forward, the drug free pain relief device that people like me are falling in love with every day now has a 90 minute treatment time and extended battery life!!!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

If you were waiting to get one, now is the time!!! The latest version sells for the same price as its predecessor, $399, but you can get it for $344 when you use my discount code DIVA at checkout.

Click here to order your device today and don’t forget that discount code DIVA will save you $55 off the new device!

Click here to discover all the different ways that Oska Pulse has improved my chronic life. It has done more than relieve chronic pain, it has reduced the frequency and severity of my migraines, sinus pain, bouts with bronchitis, and more…..

Click here to compare Oska Pulse with other PEMF products

What are you waiting for? You have nothing to lose but pain!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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The Pros and Cons of Edibles

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Edibles were my first choice when I began medicating with marijuana. You will understand why after you read my pro list.  However, there are a few drawbacks.  Today we take a look at both to help you decide if edibles are for you or not.

*Disclosure: This post includes affiliate links. Meaning that at no additional cost to you, I receive a commission when you make a purchase through my links. The proceeds earned fund the giveaways I host in my Facebook groups.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pros

  1. Discretion:  Unless I announce it, nobody has a clue that the candy or baked good I am eating has cannabis in it.
  2. Easy on the lungs:  Unlike smoking or vaping, you won’t cough up a lung while medicating.
  3. Long lasting: The high from edibles lasts much longer than from smoking or vaping.  The long lasting high is what gifted me with restorative sleep right from the beginning.  With smoking or vaping I would wake up in pain after a few hours, whereas I would sleep through the night, minus a quick potty break, and wake up feeling well rested.
  4. Cost: The price tag on edibles terrified me when I first began looking at dispensary menus.  But after I realized that each product was more than one or two doses, I discovered just how affordable edibles were.  For example, a $12 chew caramel candy that was marked as 4 doses turned out to be 6-8 doses for me.  Another thing I didn’t expect was that I only needed a full dose before bed.  I could get through most days waiting to medicate until evening and when I couldn’t I only needed a small portion of the sixth or eighth that I would need at bedtime.  Last month during my bout of bronchitis I turned back to edibles.  Each night I would eat either a half or whole square from a 12 piece candy bar.  I paid $15 for the bar which at half a piece per night would yield 24 doses.  The only way edibles wouldn’t be cost effective is if you purchase baked goods that will go stale after a day or two.
  5. Easy to micro-dose:  Knowing the dosage of each edible makes it easy to breakdown and know how much you are taking.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cons

  1. Storage: First, you want to make sure you keep edibles out of the reach of children.  Secondly, depending on the type of edible you need to make sure that you store your edibles at a temperature that it won’t melt in.  Thirdly, make sure that ants, other insects, or your pets can’t get into your storage container.
  2. Strains: Unlike flower and vape, it is almost impossible to find an edible manufacturer that lists what strain was used.  Some will notate whether they used a hybrid, indica, or sativa, but even that isn’t enough to know exactly what to expect.
  3. Waiting for it to kick in:  Edibles are not my go to form when I need to fall asleep fast.  It can take anywhere from 30-120 minutes to kick in.  This can make it difficult to follow a strict schedule.
  4. Different effect from same product: One piece of candy from the same package doesn’t always end with the same result.  Everything can vary from one bite to the next.  From how long it takes to take effect, how long the high lasts, and the high itself.
  5. Long lasting: While mostly a pro, the long lasting effect can become a con when you need aren’t able to carve out a solid 8 hours of sleep.  I am not talking about 8 hours from the point of consumption, but from the point when your meds take effect.

 

Be smart when first trying a cannabis edible of any kind.  Start with a small dosage, approx. 2-5mgs for first timers.  If you aren’t feeling any effect, wait 90 minutes after consumption before increasing your dosage.  Remember that you cannot overdose from cannabis alone.  With that said, DO NOT take with opioids or other narcotics.  If you are feeling too high, you can try combatting the effect by eating, sleeping it off, or take some CBD.

 

 

 

 

Weekly Recap 1/5/2019

 

 

 

 

 

Weekly recap:

Say Goodbye to 2018
My New Year’s Wish For You!
Quit or Modify? The Choice is Yours!
Two Things You Must Know About Planning
The Disabled Diva’s Winter Workout Challenge

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Quit or Modify? The Choice is Yours!

 

 

 

 

 

When something becomes difficult to do, do you quit or modify how you do it?

I struggled to accept that I needed to change how I did things for the first 13 years of living with fibromyalgia, psoriatic arthritis, psoriasis, endometriosis, and coccydynia.  All I wanted to do was to go on with my life the way I had and not have to figure out a new way to live.  Let’s get real, even life without a painful chronic illness can be difficult, but throw in an incurable injury or illness and it can be enough to make anyone want to throw in the towel.  My first instinct when I would discover that I was unable to do something the way I did it before becoming chronically ill was to give up.  The sad part is that if I had prepared myself to embrace change, I wouldn’t have missed out on so much during those years.

*Disclosure: This post includes affiliate links. Meaning that at no additional cost to you, I receive a commission when you make a purchase through my links. The proceeds earned fund the giveaways I host in my Facebook groups.

 

Online-Therapy.com, therapy when you need it and where you want it! Save 20% when you register through this link.   Click here to save now.

 

 

 

 

Quitter

I hear so many people say that they can’t do this or they had to give up that just because they couldn’t do it like they did before their illness or injury.  But when asked if they tried doing it differently, they became defensive.  They shut down by saying that we have no right to suggest anything because we don’t understand what they are going through.  My favorite excuse is that doing something differently isn’t the same.  Well, duh!!  Sorry, but seriously, I have done and said both.  How dare anyone suggest that I hadn’t given it my all before giving up, but if I were to tell the truth, they would be right.  I didn’t try hard enough and I am willing to bet that many others haven’t either.

I was a quitter.  Chronic pain had made doing everything so difficult that I couldn’t see alternative options.  Even when set in front of me, I hesitated to try them.  My illnesses had won control over my life.  Does that sound familiar? Are you instinctively saying no or dismissing new ideas because you are tired of having everything you do increase your pain level?  I refused to accept that doing things differently could be as satisfying, even though the end result would be the same.  What I didn’t realize is that by doing things differently, I would still have the same outcome in regards to the task, but I wouldn’t have had the extra pain that doing it the way I used to caused. But I was so terrified of increasing my pain, that I refused to even consider trying.

Like the gazillion posts I see daily on social media, I too was bitter and angry about having to give up doing things that I loved.  I was furious that I couldn’t exercise, go out, travel, care for my family, or work like I used to.  To avoid listening to other’s suggestions, I stopped taking their calls, answering the door, and even began taking extended social media breaks.  Yet, if I had just put my anger, resentment,  jealousy (yep, that is something many of us in the chronic community don’t want to admit, but many are or were jealous of those who can do what we used to do), and had opened my mind and ears, I might have began to realize that life can be good and be different at the same time.

Life modified

In the past 7 years I have learned that it is okay to do things differently. These lessons have made my life one that I wouldn’t trade for anything.  My hope is that it won’t take you reaching the point that I did (ready to commit suicide) to realize that change is okay.  I am not saying that you should be jumping for joy because now your chronic illnesses and pain are making you overhaul your entire life, but to not allow it to become a darkness that takes possession of your mind.

Here is a quick and far from full list of modifications that have made living with my chronic diseases easier and less painful:

  1. I began asking for help
  2. I found ways to work from home
  3. I have groceries delivered when unable to go shopping
  4. I used the mobile carts in stores when walking was painful
  5. To this day I utilize mobility aids FYI: Disneyland is just as much fun in a wheelchair or with a rollator as it is without!
  6. Do most of my shopping online (why waste energy that could be better spent at the beach or Disneyland?)
  7. Accept that my exercise goals and the form I participate in need to be flexible.
  8. Accept that exercise is not optional, but necessary!
  9. Allow my body to dictate my schedule for most days.
  10. Tried alternative and natural pain relief treatments
  11. I stopped fighting my body and began treating it like someone I loved.

There was and is nothing easy about anything I have done or currently do.  Living with one or multiple chronic illnesses is hard, but the hard work pays off!  Without modifications, I would be back where I was before, at home, alone, and in excruciating pain.  Although I would have argued this point 7 years ago, not changing how you live is the easy way. It is more painful, depressing, and aggravating, but it doesn’t require any work.  Making modifications to make living with your chronic illness and/or pain easier requires patience, persistence, and positive attitude.  Most of the modifications I made have decreased my daily pain levels as well as decreased the frequency and severity of my flares. The rest have made my life easier, which has resulted in less stress, which doesn’t increase my pain.

PEMF therapy with Oska Pulse has taken my pain management plan to a whole new level! Click here to see how it has improved my chronic life and click here to learn more about the device and how it may help you too! BTW My discount code DIVA will save you $55.00 when entered at checkout!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Are you ready to give up or are you ready to embrace the challenge of finding a new way to live?  I have some good news for you! You are not alone! While not always easy to find, especially in the chronic community, there are others who aren’t wallowing in self-pity. I invite you to join my Facebook groups that are filled with members who like you want to thrive and not just survive.  Another resource is my eBook Make Pain Your Bitch: How to Dominate Your Chronic Life.  It won’t cure you, but it will help you recognize areas of your life that require modification and challenge you to make those changes.  Click here to order your copy today.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

My New Year’s Wish For You!

 

 

 

 

 

 

As we begin a new chapter in our lives, I want to share my wish for you.

My wish is quite simple, yet at the same time most complicated.

In a nutshell, my wish is for you to make chronic pain your bitch!

I want you to take control over your life and health.  To work with your illnesses and around your limitations. To live a wonderful life despite being chronically ill.  I wish that you would let go of what is holding you back, this includes the fear of trying something new. I want you to love your life as much as I love mine.

To do it, you will need some tools!

Here are a few blog posts to help you start 2019 on the right foot:

Say Goodbye to 2018

Twelve ways to improve your chronic life

Resolutions without plans are just words

Chronic Attitude

An Extra Fabulous New Year

2018 Will Be a Fabulous Year If… (Still relevant today)

Ten simple resolutions

And last but not least, be motivated, inspired, and encouraged to take charge of your life in my eBook Make Pain Your Bitch: How to Dominate Your Chronic Life

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twelve Ways to Improve Your Chronic Life

 

 

 

 

 

 

Twelve Ways to Improve Your Chronic Life

Every year I see hundreds if not thousands of posts on social media from people with chronic illnesses wishing for a better new year.  Their wishes for less pain, more energy, and for an easier life are not unreasonable.  The problem is that they are just that, wishes……..   Today I am going to share 12 ways to make them a reality.

*Disclosure: I am NOT a medical professional and am NOT issuing medical advice.  I am sharing my opinions, thoughts, and experiences. You should always confer with a medical professional when considering changes to your medical or pain management plan.  This post includes affiliate links. Meaning that at no additional cost to you, I receive a commission when you make a purchase through my links. The proceeds earned fund the giveaways I host in my Facebook Groups.

1.  Identify dietary triggers

You may have heard about keto, paleo, low fodmap, and other diets, but there is not a one size fits all diet that helps reduce pain from your particular chronic illness.  You may not need to cut out an entire food group, instead you may find that it is a certain ingredient or additive that you need to avoid.  I tried and failed to experience relief from multiple diets.  What helped me find my triggers was to journal what I ate and drank and compared that information to how I was feeling.  You can find details about how I did this in my eBook Make Pain Your Bitch: How to Dominate Your Chronic Life.

2. Move your body

I know being told to exercise is the last thing you want to hear, but as I have learned, lack of movement only increases chronic pain in my hips and spine.  Movement really is necessary.  Now before you close this tab, hear me out….. I am in no way suggesting that you begin with intense workouts at the gym or going for 5 mile walks every day.  What I am suggesting is that you find ways to move your body that doesn’t increase your pain.  Before I was able to walk for miles, I had to start with what I was able to do, which at that time was one or two five minute walks a day.  There is nothing wrong with having to do seated yoga, tai chi, or simple stretches.  Click here to discover another fun way to incorporate movement into your life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

3. Listen to your body

Do you feel like you spend all of your time recovering from every activity or outing?  Listening to your body could decrease that time.  Rest when your body wants to rest.  Unless you have to keep a set schedule, nap and sleep when your body demands.  Pace yourself by breaking large tasks down into sets of smaller amounts of time.

 

 

 

 

 

4. Utilize mobility aids

If walking or standing for extended periods of time are forcing you to stay home instead of going out, it is time to start using a mobility aid.  Seriously, get over yourself and do something your body will thank you for.  Click here to read about what helped me get past the stigma of using a mobility aid.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

5.  Ask for help

Put your pride aside and ask for assistance!!! Stop assuming that people know your needs.  Just as difficult as it is for our friends and family members to understand our complex chronic illnesses, it is just as difficult to know how to help us.  Most don’t want to insult us, while others truly have no clue, so do everyone a favor and speak up!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

6. Plan with your chronic illness/pain in mind

Always consider your chronic illness and pain when scheduling appointments, outings, and social events.  I like to think of mine as invisible traveling companions.  Click here to see how this mindset helps me plan, prepare, and enjoy traveling with my chronic illnesses.

7. Stop living your old life

If you haven’t made changes to how you live your life, it is time to do it!  I know you want to show your chronic illness who is in charge and that you are hopeful that you’ll be cured in the near future, but let’s get real, it is NOT going to happen.  I too want a cure, but not making changes to how I lived until that day comes would be a huge mistake.  The only thing living my life the way I did before becoming chronically ill only resulted in more pain and less time enjoying life.  Putting my pride aside and making changes decreased my pain level and allows me to spend most of my time seeking adventure.  Need help recognizing the changes you need to make?  Check out my eBook to figure out what they are and be challenged to made them.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

8. Stop comparing yourself to others

How often do you find yourself comparing your life to others?  STOP!!! There is no comparison.  Even if you are comparing yourself with people who have the same chronic illness, there is no comparison.  Another person you may not have realized that you are comparing yourself to is the old you….. Life changes whether you like it or not, get over it, adjust, and move on.

9. Try something new

For twelve years I did everything the same and for twelve years the quality of my life plummeted. It wasn’t until I allowed myself to try new ways to combat chronic pain that I finally experienced a lower level of pain.  By permitting myself to do things differently than I did in the past I opened the door to a new and better life.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

10. Don’t give up

I see too many people give up after they discover that they are unable to do something the same way that they did before becoming chronically ill.  Stop it!!! Don’t give up! Get creative and find new ways to do what you love.  Need help?  Click here!

11. Embrace the tools available

There are so many different tools and devices to make our lives easier.  Stop resisting them and put them to use.  Whether it be a mobility aid or assistive devices to make getting around your home safer, be thankful that they are available to use.

 

 

12. Take care of your mental health

Living with a chronic illness or in constant physical pain takes a toll on your mind as well as your body. I am no stranger to therapy and highly recommend seeing a therapist if you are struggling.  Our illnesses and pain often trigger bouts of anxiety and depression.  Let us not forget the fact that we need to mourn our old life and figure out a future that includes our illnesses/pain. The good news is that you don’t have to do it on your own. If pain or lack of insurance coverage is keeping you from seeing a therapist, you may be interested in Online-Therapy.comOnline-Therapy.com is a service that gives you more access to a therapist for less than what it would cost under many insurance plans.  Caring for your emotional health is the most important thing you can do to improve your life.

 

Cannabis versus Opioids: A Different Kind of Relief

 

 

 

 

Cannabis versus Opioids: A Different Kind of Relief

The pain relief I receive from cannabis varies from the “relief” I received from opioids.  For some this is a deal breaker, for others it opens the door to a new way of living.  Today I will share the difference between how cannabis and opioids relieve my chronic pain from fibromyalgia, psoriatic arthritis, degenerative disc disease, psoriasis, and abdominal adhesions from endometriosis and surgical scarring and how the difference changed how I go about my life.

Disclosure: I am NOT a medical professional and I am not issuing medical advice. This post contains some affiliate links. Meaning that, at no additional cost to you, I earn a commission from sales. The proceeds offset the expense of operating this site and fund the giveaways for my Facebook groups.

Was it really relief?

When I was fighting chronic pain with opioids, I defined relief as no longer feeling pain.  With the right combination of anxiety medication, valium, muscle relaxers, and opioids, I was able to reach my definition of pain relief, but it came at a cost.  I could not function on the amount of medication I was taking.  Every day I had to make the choice between being present and functioning for my family or relieving chronic pain.  I want to say that I was tough and chose my family over my chronic pain, but I didn’t…… Truth was that I couldn’t!! My daily pain level was so intense that I couldn’t function without my cocktail of meds either. Each pill came with a handful of side effects that created a need for more medication.  Opioids were the cause of my frequent and painful urinary tract infections.  The money spent on emergency room visits due to new pains and complications from my medications killed my bank account.  I feared life without my meds.  I feared the how much worse my pain would be if I wasn’t able to have opioids in my system 24/7.  Even worse, I feared the pain that I would experience when they wore off.  Pharmaceutical pain medication at its best masked my pain and at its worst made me sicker than I really was.

The ZZZZZ factor

One of the problems I had with opioids is that they made me hyper.  They didn’t knock me out or make me sleepy, instead because they masked pain so well, I felt like I was super woman.  Instead of allowing my body to rest or heal, I would clean the house or do yardwork.  The problem with this was that my pain sources weren’t being addressed and although I couldn’t feel the pain increasing while medicated, I surely felt it once my meds wore off.  The aftermath also prevented sleep because I was in too much pain. My only choice was to pop more pills to numb that pain.  Unfortunately that only created more problems.  The first difference I noticed between treating pain with opioids and cannabis is that with marijuana I was able to sleep.  And I am not talking about a short nap or what I used to refer to as my opioid pain comas (medicating to the point of sleeping for days with only short intervals of being awake/alert), I am talking about getting a solid 7-10 hours of sleep per night! For the first time in my chronic life I was actually reaching levels of restorative sleep and wow, what a difference getting a good night’s sleep makes!!!! Sleeping like I should have also reduced how often I needed daytime naps.

Fully aware of pain sources

When I was treating pain with prescription narcotics I couldn’t tell you where my pain sources were.  Without pain meds my entire body, every inch, inside and out was screaming for relief.  With opioids I felt nothing. Cannabis not only made me aware of where my pain sources were, but what movements or activities would aggravate them.  Marijuana does not mask my pain, but it does provide relief.  As my medical marijuana kicks in, all my reactionary pain subsides and I am fully aware of my pain sources.  Instead of numbing my body, cannabis takes the pain from my sources and reduces it to a tingling sensation.  The perk of being able to recognize exactly where my pain is stemming from gives me the knowledge I need to make better self-care choices.

A guiding light

Cannabis guides me.  It shows me where my pain is coming from and helps me prevent it from worsening.  When medicated I can feel by whether the tingling sensation gets more intense or not if what I am doing is contributing to my pain level.  Between getting the sleep and relief I needed each night, I only had to micro-dose occasionally during the day.  To this day I rarely medicate during the day unless I have pushed too far.  Typically since I began medicating with cannabis 6 six years ago, I do so in the evenings only.  Not waking up totally inflamed made it easier for me to recognize which of my daily activities were increasing my pain and causing more damage to my body.  This prompted me to make changes to my life by changing my expectations, modifying how I did things, and discovering new ways of living a good life despite my chronic illnesses.

No longer living for a pill

Before cannabis, CBD, and PEMF therapy, pain and the pills I took to mask it ruled my life.  I only made plans if I knew I had enough pills to get through them.  If I planned something that didn’t allow me to medicate until I returned home I would spend my entire time out wishing I was at home.  I needed pills to function, but functioning led to increasing my pain, and then being sentenced to bed for weeks or months because my body couldn’t go on.  With cannabis I no longer worry about being out without it.  I know that whatever I put myself through that day, I will be able to undo it that evening.  This is something that would have never occurred with pharmaceutical pain meds.  As long as I was masking pain and unable to recognize exact pain sources and what made them worse or better, I would have never made any changes to how I lived.  Cannabis made those changes visible and possible, which in turn gifted me a life that I love.

Masking pain is not pain relief, it does not improve the quality of your life.  If you feel worse after your meds wear off, then your pain management plan is not working! My advice to someone who is new to cannabis or only tried it a few times is to commit to it and be open to making changes. Whether you start with CBD only or with THC, make it a regular part of your life.  With both, I only noticed significant changes after extended periods of time.  In regards to the pain in my feet, twelve years of opioids did nothing and I ended up not being able to walk or stand for more than five minutes.  After cannabis, it took several years before I could walk any distance without excruciating pain, but it happened!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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