No Reason Season – Why It Is Okay To Say No

There's no shame in admitting that you can't celebrate the holidays this year. Here are some reasons why it's okay to say no to holiday invites when you have a chronic illness. You don't need to explain yourself to anyone - your health comes first!

It may only be September, but in a blink of an eye, the holiday season, or as I like to call it, no reason season, will be here, and for many of us, that means a lot of socializing. From office parties to family get-togethers to friends’ nights out, there are seemingly endless opportunities to celebrate with those we love. But what if you’re not feeling festive? What if the thought of attending another holiday party makes you want to curl up in bed with a good book instead?

If you’re living with a chronic illness, it can be especially difficult to muster up the energy to socialize during the holiday season. You may find yourself turning down invitations or making excuses for why you can’t attend certain events. And that’s perfectly okay! It’s important to listen to your body and do what feels right for you. This week’s journal prompt will help you understand why it’s perfectly acceptable to say no.

It's okay to say no this holiday season; in fact it might be the best thing you can do for your mental health. If you're feeling overwhelmed by all of the demands being put on you, take a step back and read these tips. You don't need to feel guilty about setting boundaries- they are important for keeping yourself healthy!
It's okay to say no this holiday season; in fact it might be the best thing you can do for your mental health. If you're feeling overwhelmed by all of the demands being put on you, take a step back and read these tips. You don't need to feel guilty about setting boundaries- they are important for keeping yourself healthy!
It's okay to say no in any season; in fact it might be the best thing you can do for your mental health. If you're feeling overwhelmed by all of the demands being put on you, take a step back and read these tips. You don't need to feel guilty about setting boundaries- they are important for keeping yourself healthy!
There's no shame in admitting that you can't celebrate the holidays this year. Here are some reasons why it's okay to say no to holiday invites when you have a chronic illness. You don't need to explain yourself to anyone - your health comes first!

Disclaimer: This blog post contains affiliate links. I may earn a small commission to fund my coffee-drinking habit if you use these links to make a purchase. You will not be charged extra, and you’ll keep me supplied with caffeine. It’s a win for everyone. I am not a medical professional, and nothing stated in this article should be mistaken for medical advice…

No Reason Season – Journal Prompt 9/4/2022

Do you feel guilty for saying no or turning down invitations?

Why or why not?

If you answered yes, keep reading for a reminder of why you should not.

*FYI*
This is a deep dive journal prompt. Meaning that it is not expected to be finished in one sitting. Take your time and address it a little each day this week.

Saying No is Hard, But it’s Necessary

It can be difficult to say no, especially when you’re already dealing with so much. But sometimes, saying no is the best thing you can do for yourself. This holiday season, if you’re feeling overwhelmed or just not up for it, don’t hesitate to turn down invitations or requests. Your friends and family will understand.

Chronic illness can be unpredictable, and sometimes flare-ups happen at the most inopportune times. If you’re dealing with a flare-up during the holidays, don’t try to power through it. Listen to your body and take the time you need to recover. Don’t let anyone make you feel guilty for taking care of yourself.

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Awkward silence is an acceptable answer, too.

If you’re not up for socializing this holiday season, that’s okay too. Sometimes, the best thing you can do is just take a step back and take some time for yourself. If someone asks why you’re not participating in holiday activities or why you’re not joining in on the fun, it’s okay to give them a vague answer or even just stay silent. You don’t owe anyone an explanation. Just because you have a chronic illness doesn’t mean you have to over-explain yourself all the time.

The holiday season can be a difficult time for those of us who are living with a chronic illness. We may find ourselves turning down invitations or making excuses for why we can’t attend certain events. But it’s important to listen to our bodies and do what feels right for us. So if you find yourself saying no more often than usual this holiday season, don’t feel guilty about it—you’re entitled to put your health first!

Happy no-reason season!

Get more journal prompts here!

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Published by Cynthia Covert

Diagnosed in 2001 with psoriasis, followed by fibromyalgia, psoriatic arthritis, endometriosis, and later a botched hysterectomy turned her world upside down. Cynthia shares her experience, advice, and tips for how to make life with chronic pain easier and less painful.

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